TheUsDaily

Former President of the US Donald Trump | Credits: AP Photo
News Politics

What If Trump Is Convicted?

United States: A Manhattan jury commenced deliberations on Wednesday in the criminal trial of former President Trump, a case broadly perceived as a politically charged crusade against the 45th President.

The verdict of this trial could profoundly influence the 2024 presidential election and establish new precedents in New York’s criminal jurisprudence. A not guilty verdict could furnish Trump with a robust foundation for a malicious prosecution lawsuit, as per legal experts consulted by Fox News Digital.

“This case is all or nothing, assuming there is a verdict and not a hung jury,” remarked Trey Gowdy, “Sunday Night in America” host and erstwhile federal prosecutor, as per certain reports.

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg has leveled 34 felony counts of falsifying business records against Trump. Trump, unyielding, has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

The charges pertain to purported payments made prior to the 2016 presidential election to silence adult film star Stormy Daniels about an alleged 2006 encounter. Prosecutors must persuade the jury that Trump falsified business records to obscure another crime, which Bragg contends elevates the charges to felonies. This tactic is viewed by many as a brazen endeavor to weaponize the legal apparatus against a political adversary.

Louis Gelormino, a defense attorney from Staten Island, noted that the jury is likely to deliver the same verdict on all counts. “The charges are essentially the same crime reiterated,” he conveyed to Fox News Digital.

Gowdy, present in the courtroom, underscored the improbability of mixed verdicts. “I cannot foresee a verdict with some counts as guilty and others not. It’s either all guilty or all not guilty unless there’s a lesser included misdemeanor charge,” he stated.

The trial has been characterized by allegations of political partiality. Bragg, whose office has vigorously pursued this case, faces censure for what many perceive as a groundless assault on Trump. Gelormino, with 45 years of criminal law experience in New York, labeled the case as “absurd” and “obscene,” particularly given that the target is a former President of the United States.

Should Trump be convicted, he would remain eligible to run for President. Nonetheless, his campaign could be markedly constrained depending on the sentence. Legal experts conjecture about potential outcomes, including probation, home confinement, or even imprisonment—though the latter is improbable for a 77-year-old with no prior criminal record.

The notion of Trump in jail has incited discussions about Secret Service coordination and the logistics of incarcerating a former president. Alternatives like home confinement at Mar-a-Lago would inhibit his ability to campaign effectively. Probation would impose significant restrictions on Trump, potentially impeding his 2024 campaign endeavors.

Gelormino cautioned about the prospect of a politically motivated probation officer misusing authority. “Probation officers in New York City tend to be Democrats, which raises concerns about equitable treatment,” he asserted.

Trump has persistently condemned the trial as a “witch hunt” orchestrated by Democrats, with Judge Merchan described as “conflicted.” If convicted, Trump cannot pardon himself since the case falls under state jurisdiction, presenting unprecedented legal quandaries.

Should the jury fail to reach a verdict, resulting in a mistrial, prosecutors are anticipated to retry the case expeditiously. Given Bragg’s aggressive stance and Trump’s steadfast assertion of his innocence, a swift resolution seems improbable.

In the event of an acquittal, Trump could potentially pursue legal action for malicious prosecution. Gelormino believes Trump has a formidable case against DA Bragg’s office and could seek legal recourse for malfeasance against the judge, though the latter might prove more challenging.

New York City Councilman Joe Borelli advised Trump to move on if acquitted, suggesting he allow surrogates to handle discussions about the prosecutions while he concentrates on expanding his voter base. This strategy could prove efficacious, as evidenced by a recent rally in the Bronx that drew a considerable crowd.

However, given Trump’s resoluteness, it is likely he will seek legal redress if vindicated. “I think he’s got a damn good case for malicious prosecution and will undoubtedly take steps to hold those responsible accountable,” Gelormino concluded.

What’s your Reaction?
+1
1
+1
1
+1
0
+1
1
+1
1
+1
0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *